Saturday, March 20, 2010

Work

I read this quote the other day by Mohandas K. Gandhi and I really liked it...

The Roots of Violence:
Wealth without work,
Pleasure without conscience,
Knowledge without character,
Commerce without morality,
Science without humanity,
Worship without sacrifice,
Politics without principles.

This quote then, reminded me of an article that I read the other day too. It was talking about the importance of WORK. Now you don't want to ask my kids about working, because they swore that Child Labor Laws would have gotten me... after all I made them do! :)  But the truth about work and it's importance is brought up in this article and I will share part of it with you.

The First Principle: Work

To this day, I am deeply impressed by the way my family worked after having lost everything following World War II! I remember my father—a civil servant by education and experience—taking on several difficult jobs, among which were coal miner, uranium miner, mechanic, and truck driver. He left early in the morning and often returned late at night in order to support our family. My mother started a laundry and worked countless hours doing menial labor. She enlisted my sister and me in her business. With my bike I became the pickup and delivery service. It felt good to be able to help the family in a small way, and though I did not know it at the time, the physical labor turned out to be a blessing to my health as well.

It wasn’t easy, but the work kept us from dwelling too much on the difficulties of our circumstances. Although our situation didn’t change overnight, it did change. That’s the thing about work. If we simply keep at it—steady and constant—things certainly will improve.

Work is an antidote for anxiety, an ointment for sorrow, and a doorway to possibility. Whatever our circumstances in life,  let us do the best we can and cultivate a reputation for excellence in all that we do. Let us set our minds and bodies to the glorious opportunity for work that each new day presents.  ~ Dieter F. Uchtdorf

"THE HIGHEST REWARD FOR A MAN'S TOIL IS NOT WHAT HE GETS FOR IT, BUT WHAT HE BECOMES BY IT" ~ John Ruskin

"IF WE DID ALL THE THINGS WE ARE CAPABLE OF DOING, WE WOULD LITERALLY ASTOUND OURSELVES."       ~ Thomas A. Edison

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